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This one is a variation on the classic “leg raise” exercise…the key difference here lies on WHERE you’re doing the exercise.

It’s not a hanging version – it’s actually a fair bit harder than that!

With this version, you’re going to be supporting yourself on the safety rails of the power rack – it almost looks a bit like the Iron Cross position a gymnast gets into on the rings.

So first, set the safety rails on the rack to about the level of the bottom of your rib cage – you can adjust height any time.

I like to set the height so that I can set my hands on the rails while in a standing position, then bend my knees to get my feet off the ground. I find this to be easier than trying to jump up in order to have straight legs at the bottom.

The arms should be about 45 degrees at the shoulder.

Set your hands on the rails and hold on! Bend your knees and get your feet off the ground. You will instantly feel big-time tension in the abs and torso because of how you’re supporting your body in this position.

Now we add in the leg raise…

You can also do it as a knee raise…

I like to start with the straight(ish) leg raise then as I get tired, switch to the knee raise in order to keep going.

This one is BRUTAL because not only are raising the legs (which involves the abs in a movement capacity), you’re also involving the abs very strongly in a supporting capacity.

Give this one a try in your next ab-training session (do it first, before any other ab exercises – trust me on this – you probably won’t need to do any more abs after a few sets of this).

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About

Nick Nilsson, a.k.a. the "Mad Scientist of Exercise", is the author of 9 training books, such as "The Best Exercises You've Never Heard Of" series, and "Metabolic Surge - Rapid Fat Loss", which you can find at his site: http://www.fitness-ebooks.com

 

Nick has been in the fitness and bodybuilding industry more than 18 years, and  has degrees in Physical Education and Psychology, covering advanced biomechanics, kinesiology, physiology, anatomy and sports psychology, and has written for magazines such as Muscle & Fitness, Mens Fitness, Mens Health, Reps, along with numerous bodybuilding websites.

 

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